the ins and outs of espp’s, part 3: so now what?

So I gave you a summary of what ESPP’s were all about, then went into detail on the intricacies of ESPP’s and taxes. Now: what exactly are we to do with all this information? Should you participate in your company’s program, or not? And if so, how long should you hold on? Well, everyone’s situation is different, but for most people, I would say this: participate in your company’s plan as much as you are able, and sell as soon as you can. I’ll break down the reasons why, so you can see whether this applies to you in particular.

Participate, because it’s free money. The discounted price at which you get to buy the stock is, if you sell immediately, almost always guaranteed free money. (Among the exceptions are companies with extremely volatile or rarely-traded stock.) If you don’t participate, you are, as they say, leaving money on the table. Obviously you don’t want to go into debt over it, but if you can swing it, do it!

Sell immediately, because to do otherwise is to greatly increase your risk. Holding onto these shares is, in most cases, a highly risky proposition. Yes, holding onto them for long enough to make a qualified disposition may give you some tax advantage, but is it really worth dealing with the ups and downs of your company’s stock?

Moreover, if you think of an “investment” as a “source of future income”, you’re already highly invested in the company you work for. For diversification’s sake, do you really want to put even more eggs in that basket?

“OK,” you may say, “but what do I do, then, with this sudden influx of cash?” Well, your first instinct may be to splurge — and if so, that’s OK. Set aside some amount you feel comfortable with — say, 5 or 10% — and go for it. Consider giving some of it away, as well; chances are, if you have access to an ESPP, you’re in a position to help other folks out. Set the rest aside – either for basic financial goals or long-term ones, like retirement or your children’s education.

Of course, I know several engineers who quite simply and literally have more money than they know what to do with. You know who you are — and that’s perfectly OK. I may go into more detail on recommendations in a future post, but for now (assuming you’re already maxing out what options you have in the way of tax-advantaged accounts), I’ll just recommend parking the money in a well-diversified balanced stock-bond fund, such as the T. Rowe Price Balanced Fund, the Vanguard LifeStrategy Moderate Growth Fund, or the Fidelity Balanced Fund. Any of those will give you a nice, simple, inexpensive compromise between returns and stability until you decide you want to pull that “mad money” out.

Now that I’ve said that: what do you currently do with your ESPP, if you have one? Has this post given you any new ideas?

2 thoughts on “the ins and outs of espp’s, part 3: so now what?

  1. I use ESPP as a sort of forced savings plan. The amount that my employer allows me to buy just about covers our property taxes and church giving, so I sell whenever it’s time to pay the tab (generally alternate years as we “bunch” tax deductions). There is a little extra risk involved in the way I do it, but I figure the chance to pay long term capital gains tax on some of it will compensate (and if I can donate shares to the church and keep the LTCG off our return entirely, so much the better).

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